Archive for the ‘Education’ Category

Is Kwanzaa Still A Thing? – Reports are that interest in it is waning – NPR

Is Kwanzaa Still A Thing? – Reports are that interest in it is waning – NPR
December 28, 201212:00 PM ET  – Heard on Tell Me More
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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now we’d like to talk about Kwanzaa. Wednesday marked the start of the seven-day celebration of African-American culture and heritage. And if you’ve been around a while, then you probably remember that in the 1980s and 1990s, Kwanzaa was one of the trifecta of winter holidays – along with Christmas and Hanukkah, of course – that got a lot of attention from the media; from retail establishments, including the big department stores; and artists. Soul singer Teddy Pendergrass released a song “Happy Kwanzaa” on his 1998 album “This Christmas I’d Rather Have Love.” Let’s listen.

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Guyanese author, educator and diplomat- E.R. Braithwaite dies at 104

Guyanese author, educator and diplomat- E.R. Braithwaite dies at 104

Then President of Guyana, Donald Ramotar bestowing the Cacique Crown of Honour on E.R. Braithwaite.

E.R. Braithwaite, the Guyanese author, educator and diplomat whose years teaching in the slums of London’s East End inspired the international best-seller “To Sir, With Love” and the popular Sidney Poitier movie of the same name, has died at age 104, the Associated Press  (AP)  reported.   

Braithwaite’s companion, Ginette Ast, told The Associated Press that he became ill Monday and died at the Adventist HealthCare Shady Grove Medical Center in Rockville, Maryland.

(Back on August 23, 2012 he was conferred with a National Award, the Cacique Crown of Honour, by then President Donald Ramotar. At  the time, he had been in Guyana as patron of the Inter-Guianas Cultural Festival. “I am surprised because I did not expect an award. I don’t know that I have done anything to deserve the award but, I am grateful for what the award represents,” Braithwaite, who served as a diplomat in the formative years of Guyana’s independence, had told members of the media following a simple investiture ceremony at the Office of the President.)     

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A SHORT HISTORY OF VICTORIA VILLAGE –  By Joseph Barlow Snr.

A SHORT HISTORY OF VICTORIA VILLAGE –  By Joseph Barlow Snr.

With the advent of the 2016 INDABA I decided to offer the wider community a bit of the history of this colourful hamlet named Victoria Village.

Victoria Village, originally Pln. Northbrook lies some eighteen miles East of the capital city Georgetown. As far as records go it was owned by the Scottish family, The Baillie’s who also owned Pln. Dochfour. There still remains, a few miles into the farm lands, an area known as Baillie’s Polder which is famous for its yams.

Latterly, the mulatto, Hugh Rogers became the owner and on his death his executors sold the abandoned cotton estate to 63 manumitted Africans who hailed from neighboring estates of Ann’s Grove, Dochfour, Hope, Enmore and Paradise. The date of the purchase was Thursday, November 7th, 1839. In the year, 2013 November 7th was a Thursday and in the following years of the first half of this century, Thursday November 7th will occur 5 more times: 2019, 2024, 2030, 2041 and 2047.   Continue reading

First-Village Indaba & Observance of Inaugural National Day of Villages

First-Village Indaba & Observance of Inaugural National Day of Villages

The Fourth First-Village Indaba will commence on Thursday, November 3rd under the theme of “Reconstruction” and conclude four days later on the evening of the inaugural observance ofa National Day of Villages. The Indaba Planning Committee shifted the event that is usually held during Emancipation Week as a way of acknowledgement of President David Granger’s foresight and the significant symbolic decision to designate November 7 – National Day of Villages.

The Indaba Committee is in harmony with the breadth of the Head of State’s designation of the observance as it honours and celebrates the pioneering contribution of all villages and acknowledges the continuing pivotal role of villages in the economic, social, and political life of Guyana. We also view the selection of the date of November 7 as a posthumous honorific bestowal on our Ancestors – the 83 Proprietors who daringly purchased Plantation Northbrook and emerged a code for the management of the village they named after Queen Victoria.   Continue reading

Eating your placenta – is it healthy or just weird?

Eating your placenta – is it healthy or just weird?

Celebrities like January Jones and the Kardashians are doing it. But is the practice of placentophagy simply a fad, or are there actual health benefits to consuming one’s own placenta?

placentaAccording to one cookbook on the subject, you can mix your raw placenta with yoghurt and fruit in a blender and make a smoothie. Or add it to ground beef in a lasagna recipe. Or make chocolate truffles out of it. Dice it, slice it, sauté it with onions, dehydrate it and grind it up – it seems there’s no wrong way to eat placenta. Continue reading

Congratulations to Zwade J. Marshall

Congratulations to Zwade J. Marshall

Congratulations to Zwade J. Marshall, M.D., M.B.A. Harvard University • Fellowship- Interventional Pain Management • Residency- Anaesthesiology (Distinction in Research) • Chief Resident Emory University • Bachelor’s of Arts in Economics (with Distinction) • Medical Doctorate (M.D.) – Humanitarian • Master’s of Business Administra1on (M.B.A.) – Organiza1onal Management and Operations – Robeson Outstanding Achievement Prize.

Zwade was born and raised in Lamaha Gardens, Georgetown and he immigrated to the United States at the age of 16 after attending St. Jude’s pre-kindergarten, St. Margaret’s Primary School followed by Queen’s College Secondary School. In 2001, he matriculated into Emory College to pursue a Bachelor’s Degree in Economics and a pre-medicine course of study. As an undergraduate, he served as the President of the Emory College Chapter of the NAACP leading that organization to win many intercollegiate accolades for advocacy during his tenure.

Read more: Zwade Marshall – Congratulations

Mighty Shadow – Doctor Say ( 2012 ) 

David Rudder Performing at University of Calypso  

British Guiana 1856 One-Cent stamp sells for 9.5Million- most expensive ever

One-cent stamp belonging to famous du Pont murderer sells for $9.5 MILLION at New York auction – making it the most expensive ever

  • The 1856 British Guiana One-Cent Magenta sold on Tuesday for $9.5 million – although it was predicted to sell for as much as $20 million
  • It was the fourth time the stamp has broken the auction record for a single stamp in its long history
  • The stamp was found by a 12-year-old boy and went through numerous stamp collectors’ hands until it was bought by John du Pont in 1980  Continue reading