Archive for September, 2015

ELIZABETH DECEMBER 2.0 ORDAINED DEACON IN OTTAWA

ELIZABETH DECEMBER 2.0 ORDAINED DEACON IN OTTAWA

Elizabeth December ordinationBy Waltie Ainsworth

Ms Elizabeth Ann December Lovell, has been ordained a Deacon in the Ottawa diocese, earlier this week.  Elizabeth is well on her way to become a priest and is continuing religious studies at the university level in Ottawa Canada.

A former resident of Alness on the Corentyne and familiarly known as Anne among her comrades, she is second generation pastor in the Anglican Church silo…hence the 2.0 label. Her father the Reverend Father Fred December set the trend in this noble family tradition.  Continue reading

JUSTICE DECAYED ENVELOPES JUSTICE DELAYED IN GT

JUSTICE DECAYED ENVELOPES JUSTICE DELAYED IN GT

By Waltie Ainsworth

President David Granger and his wife Sandra Granger

President David Granger and his wife Sandra Granger at the Toronto event

Over the September 12th weekend, consensus building artisan and Guyana President, David Granger, illustrated and demonstrated to Toronto based Guyanese and Businessmen that the investment climate is ripe.  He said that Guyanese especially do not have to live there permanently to benefit from investment opportunities they can traverse and use secure technology to manage their investments.

The President also pitched and noted that the justice system had decayed and was very complex to upgrade.  And even though the administration had a handle on crime, there were other platforms that needed just as much action and training – notably cyber security and the judiciary.   (View FaceBook:  Bobby Ramlagan’s photos of the event) Continue reading

ALWYN NICHOLSON, LEROY SANCHO, HARRY SAUL ……….3 CHARISMATIC VILLAGERS DIE.

ALWYN NICHOLSON, LEROY SANCHO, HARRY SAUL ……….3 CHARISMATIC VILLAGERS DIE.

Friday September 11th all of Litchfield in the Tempie /Seafield village district sill come out in mournful pride to lay down gracefully an authentic and charismatic villager, Alwyn Prince Nicholson.

Alwyn is a remigrant who returned home with his family recently.  He had a pre-existing medical condition, and at the dawn of September returned to us for medical attention. Reports suggest that the very next morning on the 2nd of September, Alwyn did not rise and was pronounced dead by medical technicians.

Alwyn was a personal friend and very influential shopkeeper, rice farmer and citizen in Litchfield. My first contact with him was in the mid sixties when there was wholesale rioting in Guyana propagated by the PPP.  My parents sent me to West Berbice for safety and Alwyn introduced me to cutting rice with grass knife and ploughing the rice fields with oxen.  I also learnt to throw a cast net under his wise tutelage.  Continue reading

WATER TAXIS BEGIN MOVING PASSENGERS ACROSS BERBICE RIVER

WATER TAXIS BEGIN MOVING PASSENGERS ACROSS BERBICE RIVER

Berbice River Bridge

Over the weekend, former members of the Rosignol Fishermen’s Cooperative took the initiative to retrofit their boats converting them to water taxis ferrying school children especially, at super lower rates much to the delight of the Granger Administration.  Reports from the region suggest that Former President Jagdeo and the Berbice River Bridge Authority were playing hardball and forcing the administration to increase fares rather than reduce same.  Some businessmen, farmers, car and mini bus operators will get further relief with the reintroduction of the Torani and Makouria passenger vessels that will ferry vehicles across the river.

Race has been injected into the Berbice Bridge tolls fiasco as opposition leader Bharrat Jagdeo is fanning the flames of functional non cooperation. Some farmers cannot handle the narrow mindedness of Jagdeo and are fasting to death………a Hindu practise called santara. Continue reading

For-profit education – The $1-a-week school

For-profit education – The $1-a-week school

EducationPrivate schools are booming in poor countries. Governments should either help them or get out of their way

Aug 1st 2015 | The Economist

ACROSS the highway from the lawns of Nairobi’s Muthaiga Country Club is Mathare, a slum that stretches as far as the eye can see. Although Mathare has virtually no services like paved streets or sanitation, it has a sizeable and growing number of classrooms. Not because of the state—the slum’s half-million people have just four public schools—but because the private sector has moved in. Mathare boasts 120 private schools.

This pattern is repeated across Africa, the Middle East and South Asia. The failure of the state to provide children with a decent education is leading to a burgeoning of private places, which can cost as little as $1 a week (see article). Continue reading