Archive for June 15th, 2012

Zen and the art of carmaking

Zen and the art of carmaking

Japanese firms are known for craftsmanship. But they need showmanship, too

Jun 16th 2012 | The Economist

IN JAPAN companies are built to last. The world’s oldest firm is a Japanese builder, Kongo Gumi, which dates back to 578. More than 14 centuries later, it sticks to its core business: the upkeep of Buddhist temples in Osaka. Many Japanese firms also have founding principles that employees engrave on their hearts. Common themes include longevity, consistency and integrity. Chasing profit for its own sake is still considered grubby in Japan, like blowing your nose in public.

In this pristine world making things is considered more virtuous than selling them. This is not only a Japanese trait: in, too, hackers prefer not to mingle with mere hawkers. But in Japan engineering is revered with an almost religious passion; indeed, the idea that anything can be lovingly tinkered to perfection owes something to Zen Buddhism.  Far less attention is given to marketing. In a world of global brands this is a mistake. Japanese businesses need to master the art of storytelling, too.   [more]

APNU/AFC CONTROLLING THE NARRATIVE

David Rudder – A Madman’s Rant.

APNU/AFC  CONTROLLING THE NARRATIVE

By Ewalt Ainsworth                                                     06 11 2012

Somebody must have whispered to President Jagdeo that this is a ‘dress-down’ world but he is so addicted to being a majority of one that he cannot ‘leggo’ and let President Ramotar splutter, stutter and suffer.  Ramotar by himself is nothing, but you can still see his little ego pushing thru but stifled and confused, not knowing where to turn and how to go from nothing to anything.

At one time, Ramotar had pinned his hopes on oil but the Venezuelans do not know how to turn their backs when they see wrong things happening.  Charity begins at Charity; you cannot be stealing and smuggling the oil one day in lungitah and the next day become Honorary Consul to Spain and hope for a breakthrough.  The PPP has to learn to craft a narrative of grace and galvanise its sovereignty rather than gamble with the gutter rats in polyester suits.    Continue reading