THE SOVEREIGNTY OF VILLAGES

THE SOVEREIGNTY OF VILLAGES        

By Ewalt Ainsworth                                     03 12 2012

In the heat of the winter a few short years ago Gt-Goatie called urging “come represent.”  His second mortgage and now wife, who originally hails from Buxton, welcomed me with open arms to the bustling christening off Norwood Street in East Orange, NJ.  Once settled, I realised that I was one of four people from Victoria.  House full, kitchen full and basement had standing room only.  I had to become a counter revolutionary and stand to attention and nurse the items of roti and curry, channa pockets, Creole food and dense beers as per request every 20 minutes or so.

While there that solitary Sunday but noise-filled party, I discovered village matters.  Every Buxtonian in the party did not make it a secret of his sovereignty; he/she spoke in superlatives and conducted every conversation in such a way that the village was good and could never be better because of the reservoir of the talent pool, knowledge base and the resourcefulness of the people.  One man, whose mother was from Victoria and father from Buxton, tried playing it both ways and succeeded.  Village matters.   

When I visit places like Hopetown, Salton Farm, Bartica, Dartmouth, Linden or Kwakwani their residents do not duck their original communities.   The tempo of the conversation and the quality of the relationship is determined based on which community one is sovereign to; in North America your job/income determines the relationship.

You can come from Cameroon or Oshawa and you have money you can play but funny, Guyanese Indians respond with great suspicion like if they thief something. You meet a Guyanese Indian; you have to squeeze it out of him.  Not only do you have to squeeze it but s/he would tell you on an installment plan that “me from Bush Lot (Region Five).”  The other Bush Lot in Essequibo…Region Two is layered with Blackmans, Gorings, Davidsons, Amsterdams and Haynes; and none of them lie.  Black people can’t lie and the other thing is all these family names mentioned have roots in Buxton and Victoria but that is a subject to be treated in a different arena.

The Buxtons and the Victorias of Guyana are getting overcrowded.  The PPP over the last 18 years has pushed Tiger Bay into the flatlands and wet lands along the East Coast corridor.  The PPP has uprooted the black people from the prime real estate and resettled them on lands along the main highway so that they can be seen and pitied and made vulnerable.  I refuse to discuss rapes, assaults, domestic violence and burglaries in this piece.  The land is acidic and ascetic; nothing grows but people must subsist and be happy.  No jobs either.

There are no longer open spaces to fly kites for none of the affected publics.  There are no longer open spaces to cultivate parks and what we had known as rice fields and cane fields are now teeming with squatters and low income housing.

At last check, Guyana still has 83,000 square miles.  There has also been some migration from East Asia, Brazil and Venezuela.  Real black people not coming to Guyana and those that remain cannot find work.  They are not willing to trade their dignity and self pride by endearing themselves to the managed care (growing marijuana and cocaine) programs pushed by the PPP.

The East Indians do not have it in their DNA to be sovereign to their true selves and have no concept of humility and faith.  They have been pedaling dope, trading their bodies and sacrificing their children all in a mad gallop to be materially rich.  Unfortunately too, only a small percentage of the monies they generate is returned or invested in Guyana.  And when they do invest in the country, they refuse to pay adequate rates and taxes so that certain basic creature comforts exist.

It must be remembered too that Indians came to Guyana as indentured servants and so there is no real maternal and or paternal tie to the land.  Sovereignty is a loaded word and so lessons in patriotism, nationalism and conservatism are not imparted.  Shared governance does not have an appeal; the appeal is in wheeling and dealing and or dealing and stealing.

Today, Thursday, March 15, 2012 is Budget Day in Guyana.  All eyes are on the Finance Minster to see what type of illusive and corrosive deals he would drum up to stave off accountability and sovereignty in this new noble experiment.


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2 responses to this post.

  1. Posted by CS on March 15, 2012 at 2:28 pm

    Question. Aren’t there some good things being done to our brothers and sisters in Guyana at this time.

    Reply

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