PEDAL PUSHERS AND PUSHOVERS…A PPP SAGA

PEDAL PUSHERS AND PUSHOVERS…A PPP SAGA

By Ewalt Ainsworth                             03 09 2012

Late this week a man from Buxton and his Indian wife got robbed and one of his buddies got shot in full view outside of busy Bourda market during lent and a day after Phagwah.  In most other territories, in most other countries 100 days after ascending to electoral office, the politicians go to their microphones and media to assail their achievements.  In Guyana we have all been relegated to the status of pedal pushers and or pushovers.  Some pedaling dope, while others are pedaling stupidness, and trying to call it bravery.

In the first 100 days in most other climes, crime goes down and productivity goes up.  (Let your conscience be your guide).  In Guyana we have achieved and surpassed all age appropriate behaviors; one a day is killed on the roads, one a day is robbed; one a day is shot, one a day is fired for corruption and one a day a ship goes missing at sea with suspicious cargo. There will be no mention of the millions that go missing within the Ministry of Home Affairs or those who are denied medical attention and pushed to die at the local hospitals.  I will be absurd to mention those things.

The peace loving and religious minded populace has slipped into a dark place.  More people are shot and robbed daily than cows are slaughtered in the butcher-shop.  No community is safe anymore and the technology of cell phones, laptops and super cars is making us all more selfish and twice as vulnerable.    We have more rainy days than we have mops and no one is willing to make the small changes to make the people think and behave like they are from the same ship and made the same trip.  It is worrisome 100 days after a pact of shared governance that an elder from the potentially most feared community in Guyana can be relieved of his dignity and money.  The change that was promised is small change; you either have to be a pedal pusher or a pushover to experience change in the cooperative republic.

The pedal pushers are not complaining.  Worst, they are not even explaining the quantum theories and the leaps and excursions into skullduggery.  And now they are pushing out feelers to see if another election will sit well and to see if they would be able to shake off the invasive strategies of the joint opposition.

The joint opposition headed up by Brigadier Granger (APNU) and Khemraj Ramjattan (AFC) are proving not to be push-overs.  They have barnacled themselves to the issues, events, experiences and extreme plans to level the playing field and make Guyana a truly plural and diverse society.

The placebo President, Mr. Donald Ramotar has been extremely slow off the starting bloc.  He is also slothful and sloppy and does not know where to begin and at this juncture, is contemplating seriously calling fresh elections.  The flip side of this snap election is that he may not be the candidate of the PPP.  But he is prepared to take the chance and if even he is pushed out of power, he would make as much money as Jagdeo…approximately US500.00 per day; no stress, no pressure.  He has already started rehearsing for that new role by not saying anything positive or doing anything constructive.  The people will get lowra.

Mr. Ramotar, during the first 100 days has been pedal pushing to get oil on stream.  But some have already started asking whether the local populace will benefit?  In Nigeria, which has been a major oil producer for more than 100 years, there are still has bad roads, sporadic electricity and few laptops. It is is still underdeveloped.  Venezuela is another example of nuff-oil but little to show for it.

Guyanese have already started to buy up luxury cars, air conditioned buildings and electronic gizmos long in advance of the oil seeping through the pipelines.  We have added all the things and neglected the schools in preparation for the great push for oil when in fact we should be building technical schools and refining the blue prints to make the project work for us rather than a remote and foreign public.

Guyana used to be a major exporter of rice, sugar, plantains and pineapples a few short decades ago.  We have lost these franchises and have to look to containerized shipments and heavy markups to feed ourselves.

One hundred days is a long time.  Babies born on that day in November have already achieved and surpassed age appropriate activities.  It is so unusual for a new President to be so withdrawn and withheld.  Some are beginning to think that he may be a push-over.

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2 responses to this post.

  1. I am losing faith in democracy and capitalism.

    Reply

  2. Posted by LIBERATOR on March 16, 2012 at 2:21 pm

    I am begining to hate the Indian blood that is running through my veins ..

    Reply

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